February 2019 Press Release

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Press Release             

IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  February 7th, 2019

Invitations sent to local government councils to take part in what could be Australia’s largest painting art competition. All to help Australians better understand and stand against modern day slavery.

The National Art Competition to raise awareness of modern-day slavery by helping to further encouraging open discussion about the subject with everyday Australians.

The Paint4Freedom Art Competition will accept entries from amateur, emerging and established artists and will be run over four levels of competition, the first being the local community competitions ideally held in each local government council region across the country.

Modern day slavery is a broad, generic label encompassing a number of very serious human rights violations imposed on an estimated 25-45 million souls around the world. Slavery also exists in Australia and we are encouraging Australians to understand the issue and discover ways they can stand against it both here in Australia and internationally.

The Australian Federal Parliament have passed the Modern Slavery Bill 2018 finally on November 29th, 2018. This is of course a good and strong step in the right direction.

The bill establishes a Modern Slavery Reporting Requirement for companies and other entities in Australia exceeding an annual consolidated revenue of at least 100 million Australian dollars, to make annual public reports (Modern Slavery Statements). These statements must present what actions the organisation are taking to address modern slavery risks in their operations and supply chains.

There is of course much more to be done. We believe that nothing will change until the general population understand slavery is worse than at any other time in history and that we as Australians take a stand against the many different types of slavery.

Paint4Freedom is partnering with Rotary Clubs and local councils across Australia to host their Local Community Paint4Freedom Competitions.

Each Local Community Paint4Freedom Competition will be open to all Amateur and Budding (15-18 yrs) Amateur Artist Painters within that council area.

Chosen paintings and their artists will progress through to a Regional level then to State and finally the National level of competition.

Emerging and Established Artists are invited to submit entries at the State and National levels.

Artists are asked though this is not mandatory, to allow Paint4Freedom or their local Rotary Club to sell their entered paintings, with funds raised going to assist organisations involved in anti-slavery programs. These organisations are listed on the Paint4Freedom website- http://www.paint4freedom.org/we_support

We also see this as an opportunity to showcase the work of many young Australian artists across the country and to give them a means to express their voice against slavery.

 

For more information please contact:

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About Paint4Freedom

Paint4Freedom started when it was suggested that the main challenges for ending

Modern-day Slavery are-

  1. To better educate the general public about the problem, whilst providing a means for the public to somehow be involved and become abolitionists themselves.
  2. To raise funds to assist antislavery organisations on the front line of this fight.

Paint4Freedom will meet both challenges with competition timing as a key factor to involve the general public in the discussions, actions and outcomes from the Australian Government’s new legislation.

Paint4Feedom Ltd. is incorporated as a not-for-profit corporation entity holding Charity Status with the A.C.N.C. as an organisation Promoting or Protecting Human Rights.

About Modern-day Slavery

Modern-day Slavery is a serious global human rights issue impacting an estimated 20-45

million individuals from 167 countries including Australia. Human trafficking is akin to

modern-day slavery. It occurs when people are forced into exploitative situations for profit.

Men, women and children are exploited for a wide range of purposes, including forced labour, sexual exploitation, domestic servitude and child soldiers. While trafficking for sexual exploitation is more commonly reported among women and girls, it can also happen to boys.

Modern-day Slavery and human trafficking are, for the most part, hidden crimes with the full scale globally, not clearly known.

Human trafficking is different to people smuggling. People smuggling is a crime against a

country with people illegally smuggled across borders. Human trafficking is an exploitative

crime against an individual. While people consent to being smuggled, human trafficking does not involve consent of those being trafficked.

People smuggling is always across borders, while this is not necessarily the case for trafficking. And whereas people smuggling has a final destination, human trafficking involves ongoing exploitation usually until those being trafficked, either escape, are rescued or die.

Slavery was prohibited under the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states:

"No one shall be held in slavery or servitude: slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in

all their forms."

Definitions of Modern-day Slavery

Definitions of Modern-day Slavery are primarily taken from the 1956 UN Supplementary Convention, which states: "debt bondage, serfdom, forced marriage and the delivery of a child for the exploitation of that child are all slavery-like practices and require criminalisation and abolishment".

The 1930 Forced Labour Convention defines forced labour as "all work or service which is exacted from any person under the menace of any penalty and for which the said person has not offered himself voluntarily".

As contemporary systems of slavery have evolved, new definitions, including trafficking and distinguishing child slavery from child labour, have also developed.